Nihilism-In-Tension

A Theology of Kenosis as a Response to Some Nihilistic Inclinations in the Context of Contemporary Slovakia

by Martin Sebo, S.J.

09/19/2017

One of the pastoral problems of religiosity in Slovakia today is that contemporary Christianity is pervaded by nihil-inclinations. Such inclinations manifest themselves in the loss of orientation and meaning, and a disinterest in Christianity, which has by and large remained on a doctrinal, moralistic, and ritual level without offering a constructive faith response to the 'signs of the times'. This dissertation argues that nihilism is not an entirely negative or morose concept that leaves behind a void or abyss without values, rendering this world meaningless. Nihilism as such is not an absolute (demonizing) danger; rather, it is the failure to adequately engage it that constitutes the pro-nihilizing threat. My analysis of nihilism begins with Nietzsche. In analyzing his texts, I propose m...

Nothing New Under the Sun

An Introduction to Islam

by Paul Culp

09/24/2007

Islam draws more attention to itself with each passing day, but surprisingly few people know much about it, even in government, the media, education, and the Church. Nothing New Under the Sun is an accessible, up-to-date study of Islam’s past and present, with an acute analysis of its core logic and what that logic might mean for the future. Islam is a religion not just of scripture and tradition but also of community consensus, and it is not comprehensible without an examination of how that consensus is formed and the direction it is likely to take. Islam’s relationship to the West must also be understood in light of the contemporary Western religious climate - specifically the American one - which is failing badly as an alternative to the Islamist model. Nothing New Under the Sun...

How Science Can Help Us Live In Peace

Darwin, Einstein, Whitehead

by Markolf H. Niemz, Ph.D.; James D. Dunn, trans.

06/01/2018

Award-winning biophysicist Markolf H. Niemz puts into a nutshell what the top 3 scientists on earth have discovered. Charles Darwin: Animal and man are not two. Albert Einstein: Space and time are not two. Alfred N. Whitehead: The world and I are not two. The world we live in is non-dualistic. Nature is crying for peace, but we shut off foreign from native, poor from rich, others from ourselves. It is our concept of the self that stands in the way of peace. Based on Darwin's, Einstein's and Whitehead's scientific discoveries the author demonstrates how easily we mistake reality. There is neither a personal self nor an external, almighty God. Eternity, which most religious people hope for, does not begin at death. It is here and now—at the speed of light when all distances turn zero.This ...

Christianity without the Cross

A History of Salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism

by Thomas A. Fudge

04/05/2003

Grounded in primary source research, this boldly revisionist book examines the doctrine of salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism (United Pentecostal Church) from its origins through its several developmental stages. The gradual rise of a literal interpretation of Acts 2.38 eliminated a tradition of doctrinal diversity within Oneness thought which regarded salvation as occurring at repentance prior to water and Spirit baptism. With this development a main link to the wider stream of evangelical Christianity was severed. The "water and Spirit" theology resulted in a form of Christianity which does not necessarily require the cross in any meaningful sense for salvation. This study recovers the lost theological tradition associated with important figures such as Howard A. Goss, A.D. Gurley, W.M....

by Jan G. Linn

06/26/2004

Silence may be golden, but not when it comes to the extremes of the Christian Right. That is why Jan Linn wrote his new book, What's Wrong With The Christian Right, just released by BrownWalker Press. As a former college and seminary teacher and author of ten previous books, Linn uses the Christian Right's own words and actions to show the extent to which it is trying to reshape both American politics and Christianity into its own image. The book describes in detail the agenda of the Christian Right, the tactics it employs, and the ways it plays loose with truth. It is also a call to action to everyone disturbed by the power and influence of the Christian Right. With careful documentation, this book exposes the extent to which the Christian Right is influencing American politics, who ...

Theory and Practice of Modern Islamic Finance

The Case Analysis from Australia

by Abu Umar Faruq Ahmad

12/29/2009

Theory and Practice of Modern Islamic Finance seeks to contribute to the existing body of work in the area of Islamic finance through examining the extent of divergence in practice of Islamic financing from the traditional Shari`ah in the Australian context. The author makes a discursive analysis of the regulation of Islamic finance in Australia in terms of (a) the financing instruments used, (b) certainty of transactions between participants in the system, and (c) institutional risk management of Islamic financial institutions. The work's objectives are two-fold: (a) to analytically study the extent to which Islamic Financial Services Providers (IFSPs) of Australia differ from the traditional Shari`ah in their current practices of Islamic legal financial system by their use of different f...

Can The Rebbe Be Moshiach?

Proofs from Gemara, Midrash, and Rambam that the Rebbe cannot be Moshiach

by Gil Student

07/23/2002

During his lifetime, the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson of blessed memory, was a highly successful religious leader. His brilliant scholarship and eloquent speaking touched hundreds of thousands of people. Larger than life and presiding in a post-Holocaust world during which Jews returned to the land of Israel in an unprecedented fashion, he was declared by many of his followers to be the Moshiach (Messiah) for whom Jews have waited for thousands of years. His death in 1994 should have dashed those hopes. However, many of his followers have advanced the position that even today the Rebbe can still be Moshiach.This book is an analysis of this position within the Jewish tradition. What do the doctrinally binding texts say about a dead man being Moshiach? In a pres...

GOD

A Psychological Assessment

by Gary M. Bakker

05/23/2013

What is God really like? What sort of personality does he have? What are his values and priorities? And who can best answer such questions? These are vital questions for anyone who wants to understand and please him, and so ensure an eternal future. But they are not philosophical or theological questions. They are about his psychology. Gary Bakker is a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience at answering these questions. He has studied God's words and deeds (his self-report and his behavior), found evidence of 16 psychological characteristics of God, and from these, reports some surprising conclusions. For example, if God has what we would regard as a diagnosable psychological problem, can it be treated? The 16 features/chapters that lead to an overall diagnosis and conclus...

by Michael A. Barber

11/27/2006

This is a highly controversial exposition of a doctrine which has dominated Christianity for two thousand years. The book takes apart, piece by piece, the very foundation that so many religions use to support the belief that there are three persons in one God. It analyses the major scriptural references pointed to in Trinity support texts, and examines them in the light of biblical context and by original-language comparisons. World-renowned authorities on biblical Hebrew and Greek are sought for their views on these key scriptures. This is a compelling book which turns the very foundation of Christianity onto its head.

The Islamic Shield

Arab Resistance to Democratic and Religious Reforms

by Elie Elhadj

11/20/2008

Washington’s “War on Terrorism” has used democratization of the Arab World as a justification and a weapon. The Islamic Shield contends that genuine religious and political reforms in the Arab World are sheer fantasy: they are not expected for a very long time, if ever. The Islamic Shield argues that democratic ideology cannot defeat Islamic theology. A culture of blind obedience to autocratic authority at home, school, mosque, and work place has been turned into a form of piety by the ulama clerics. The Islamic Shield focuses on the interaction between political Islam and world politics. The book analyses the likely consequences of Arab resistance to political and religious reforms in the Middle East and beyond, especially the Arab-Israeli conflict and the U.S. project in Iraq. ...

How to Prove god Does Not Exist

The Complete Guide to Validating Atheism

by Trevor Treharne

08/09/2012

How to Prove god Does Not Exist is the complete guide to the nonbeliever stance. The most diverse validation of atheism ever written, it deconstructs every major criticism of atheism and defense of religion through logical, philosophical, historical, cultural, moral and scientific means. This builds towards a more strident approach towards asserting atheism, with five key justifications outlined for why god does not exist. This expansive work employs the philosophy of Epicurus, David Hume and Friedrich Nietzsche, the science of Charles Darwin, Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, plus the logic of Bertrand Russell, the psychoanalysis of Sigmund Freud, and the contemporized insights of New Atheism advocates such as Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins. It features original conclud...

by Gillian Towler Mehta

03/03/2011

The thesis has one main focus, the purity laws of a religious group in Europe, an original piece of research never done before in the UK. The thesis uses diasporic theories of identity; theories of women and the body; theories of women, their bodies and patriarchal religion and theories of women, purity and pollution in religion, to explain why European Zoroastrian women continue to support six of the purity laws of Zoroastrianism in the year 2003. Purity and pollution are at the heart of the Zoroastrian religion and the research demonstrated that Zoroastrians belief in and knowledge of the six purity laws was strong in 2003. Zoroastrians are a diasporic religious group whose modern origins are in Iran and the sub-continent of India. They have been visiting and settling, from the sub-co...

The Islamic Moral Economy

A Study of Islamic Money and Financial Instruments

by Shafiel A. Karim

07/23/2010

The Islamic Moral Economy is an academic book that analyzes the religious permissibility or lack thereof of the existing repertoire of financial instruments used in Islamic banking and finance. The work is both timely and sound, especially considering the growth of the international Islamic banking and insurance industries, and the Great Recession of 2007-2010. The Islamic Moral Economy is an excellent introductory book for academics and finance professionals wishing to gain a better understanding of Islamic moral constraints on economic transactions and how most current Islamic banking transactions are structured. More specifically, the author examines the utopian nature of the Islamic moral economy with a special emphasis on riba (i.e., financial interest and illogical increase), ...

Living Words

The Words of Christ in Aramaic-English Interlinear Edition

by Joseph P. Elias

09/27/2002

An English transcription of original words of Christ in Aramaic language in which he spoke with a parallel English translation. A reader can enjoy hearing Christ speaking, and also use it as a medication to cleanse the soul. 4th century Peshitta Aramaic translation of the gospels is used as a basis in reconstructing Christ's words which are presented in a historical sequence, combining the synopsis of the four gospels.

by Heshey Zelcer

02/27/2002

This book is a compilation and composition of the Jerusalem Talmud, the cultural, economic and political conditions in the Land of Israel during its development, the scholars who studied it throughout the generations, and a synopsis of their research and commentaries.Examined in detail is the transformation of the Roman empire from paganism to Christianity and the effect this has had on the Jerusalem Talmud. Also explored is the sordid and almost successful attempt at the end of the 1800's to present a forged work as the newly "discovered" missing Order of the Jerusalem Talmud.Jewish Law is based on the Talmud which was codified approximately 1500 years ago. There are actually two Talmuds, one which was codified in Babylonia (The Babylonian Talmud) and the other which was codified in the L...

by Joshua Safier

06/04/1997

The Yasukuni Shrine -- Japan's national memorial enshrining the spirits of Japanesesoldiers killed in domestic and foreign wars -- occupies a peculiar chapter in Japanese history. Originally designed as a sanctuary to house the spirits of those who died in overthrowing the Tokugawa Regime, Yasukuni was nurtured by the state and then the military into a powerful religious and iconographic center to promote Japanese ultranationalism. Following the close of World War II, the Shrine became the subject of intense politico-religious debates as the Japanese, with the assistance of the international community, consigned themselves to the task of finding a place for Yasukuni as they worked on their postwar project of reinventing nationalism and cultural identity. This thesis provides a n...

We Will Not Be Stopped

Evangelical Persecution, Catholicism and Zapatismo in Chiapas, Mexico

by Arthur Bonner

12/16/1998

The power of the Bible to transform lives and societies has seldom been demonstrated more vividly than in Chiapas in southern Mexico. Beginning in the early 1940s, young men and women of the Summer Institute of Linguistics devised written scripts and then translated the Bible into the languages of the most neglected and most oppressed of indigenous peoples: the Tzeltals, Tzotzils, Chols and Tojolabals. A major part of this book is the narrations of indigenous people who experienced the Bible's power to heal bodies and create loving families. They became apostles, seeding new congregations. They refused to accept what they saw as idols made by human hands and rejected the cults of village saints. For this, they were, like the first Christians, persecuted and dr...

Pastoral Care of the Mentally Ill

A Handbook for Pastors

by J. A. Davis

11/01/2000

Pastoral Care of the Mentally Ill is written for pastors, associate pastors, Christian education leaders, choir directors, and others working with congregations. It tells in everyday language the symptoms of mental illness and the do's and don'ts of pastoral care of people dealing with mental illness. Told through stories of people suffering through such illnesses, the book offers a glimpse into their lives and steps to be taken by pastoral professionals.

by Jenny Kien

02/01/2000

A GODDESS FOR WOMEN'S PRAYERS Goddesses in ancient religions were particularly significant for women's physical, social and spiritual well-being. Yet, the Divine Woman was discarded by the monotheistic religions. Arguing her importance for women, the author proposes returning the Divine Woman to Judaism. Textual, archeological and historical analysis reveal how the Canaanite Great Goddess Asherah played a major role as Jahweh's consort in the religion of biblical Judah and Israel. The author shows how this goddess has not entirely disappeared from modern Judaism - her analysis of the expulsion from the Garden of Eden and the story of Tamar and Judah reveals many traces of Asherah's worship and myths still in the Bible. The development of the menorah and the kabbalistic Tree of Life...

Answering the Call

The Story of the U. S. Military Chaplaincy from the Revolution through the Civil War

by William E. Dickens, Jr.

04/16/1999

This book argues that the standardization of the American military chaplaincy occurred during the Civil War. It shows that the chaplains of the North and South provided the model on which the modern chaplaincy is based. This model is seen in both the regulations which were established during this war and the actual ministry of the chaplains with the men of their assigned units. To accomplish this task, the book traces the history of the military chaplaincy from the American Revolution through the American Civil War. This analysis relies heavily on official documents and reports as well as personal accounts, letters, and diaries. It also incorporates appropriate secondary source material.

by Kam-Lun E. Lee

12/10/1997

This thesis will investigate, by means of the historical-critical method, Augustine of Hippo's understanding of the Manichaean idea of the Good, and how this understanding affects his own related notions of summum bonum and personal evil, and, as a corollary, his doctrine of predestination. The question of a possible Manichaean influence is particularly pertinent because Manichaeism is at heart a dualistic solution to the issue of good and evil. The focus is not on Manichaeism per se but on Augustine's perception of it, as more directly affecting his thinking. Augustine's treatise De natura boni (399) in part summarizes his treatment of "the nature of the Good" in earlier polemics. From his first writing, De pulchro et apto (380), to that point, Augustine understands the Manichaean co...

OUT OF THE BROOM CLOSET?

A Guide to Revealing Your Practice of Witchcraft to Others

by Gary Cantrell

11/18/1998

Out Of The Broom Closet deals openly and honestly with the questions and issues surrounding a witches decision to make his or her hither-to hidden practice of the Old Religion known to family members, friends and co-workers. The author has attempted to discuss this issue candidly, and while offering suggestions and guidelines to possibly ease the process of stepping out the book in no way implies that this step is one that should be taken by all practitioners of witchcraft. Out Of The Broom Closet includes brief chapters on the definition and history of the Wiccan religion but deals primarily with the pro's and con's of making one's practice of Wicca known to others, describing in detail the authors personal experiences in doing so. The legal and emotional rational supporting the deci...

Nichiren's Nationalism

A Buddhist Rhetoric of a Shinto Teaching

by Achilles S C Gacis

08/25/2000

Chapter One, "Religion and Nationalism in Early Kamakura Society" introduces the issues that affected the nation in the early Kamakura period. The first section points out the historical background of the time that was considered to be a spiritually significant age according to Buddhist chronology. The next section on the "Religious Answers to National Problems" provides a prelude to how the indigenous religious tradition of Shinto attempted to define its leaders and their right to rule as well as the divine protection that was to be given them by the native deities. The imported Buddhist teachings provided a new perspective to the national problems through an examination of existing conditions as possibly being consequences of immoral acts. The various characteristics of the teaching...

Sharia Law and the Arab Oil Bust

PetroCurse or Cost of Being Muslim?

by Glenn L Roberts

01/22/2007

The delayed development of the Islamic world, in defiance of the formulaic approaches long favored by economists, suggests that the traditional Sharia and Islamic values and principles are at least partially responsible for the region’s persistent backwardness. By analyzing the impact of the legal regime of the Sharia on Saudi Arabia during the Arab Oil Bust of the 1980s, this thesis concludes that Islamic social values and the Sharia’s de facto role as an uncodified pre-emptive Arab common law implemented with high regard to precedent by ulama with extraordinary power of judicial review had the effect of accentuating the effects of the Oil Bust, making the theory of the Petrocurse a subset of a larger Cost of Being Muslim. On the other hand, the author concludes that not only is th...

Raising the Question of Being

A Unification and Critique of the Philosophy of Martin Heidegger

by Rufus A. Duits

11/17/2009

The thesis consists of two main divisions. The first presents an original interpretation of Martin Heidegger's philosophy. The second - premised on the first - presents a fundamental and internal critique of his philosophy. The interpretative division demonstrates the way in which the history of being is structurally grounded in the ontological conformation of Dasein. This amounts to evincing the unity of Heidegger's development of his basic philosophical project: the raising of the question of being, and requires an original account of both the philosophy of the history of being and the existential analysis of Dasein, as well as of the so-called Kehre. The critical division, which is founded upon the conclusions of the interpretative division, focuses on the structural grounding that He...

Falun Gong in the United States

An Ethnographic Study

by Noah Porter

06/27/2003

Falun Gong, also known as Falun Dafa, has been described in many ways. It has been called qigong, one of many schools of physical exercises that aim at improving health and developing supernatural abilities. Scholars and mainstream media have referred it to as a spiritual movement or religion, although practitioners claim it is not a religion. It has been called a cult, in the pejorative sense rather than in a sociological context, by the Chinese government and by some Western critics. In the writings of Li Hongzhi, the founder of Falun Gong, it is referred to in different ways, though primarily as a cultivation practice. The question of how to define Falun Gong is not just an academic issue; the use of the cult label has been used to justify the persec...

Impurity and Death

A Japanese Perspective

by Chikara Abe

09/28/2003

Personal impurity caused by childbirth, menstrual blood or death is an issue of concern prevalent in many cultures. In Japan, the generic term for these kinds of impurities is kegare and death impurity, a sub-type of kegare, is known as shi-e. The major topic of this book is death impurity. The definition and genesis of shi-e are explained. In addition, details of the influence shi-e had on ancient Japanese society as well as its continuing influence on modern Japanese society are given. Three hypotheses are stated and supported: (1) the shi-e concept began in Japan during the Yayoi period (300 BC - 300 AD) rather than at a later date as previously hypothesized; (2) the basis for the aversion to dead bodies, i.e. shi-e, is that corpses remind people of the fact that they will soon die...

Overcoming Women's Subordination in the Igbo African Culture and in the Catholic Church

Envisioning an Inclusive Theology with Reference to Women

by Rose N. Uchem

06/09/2001

When African scholars lament over the near destruction of African cultures, they do not reflect the reality of African women's historical traditions of empowerment and inclusion in pre-colonial/pre-Christian African societies, which were also lost in the same process of Western Christian cultural imperialism. Similarly, most male Church theologians writing or speaking about inculturation do not address the deeper cultural issues, which impact heavily on African women. As Nigerian theologian, Rose Mary Edet rightly observed, "policy-related and other research projects concerned with "women in development" often uncover cultural factors without associating them with religious beliefs and myths that rule women's lives" (in Life, women and culture, 1991, Introduction). Yet, these deeper cultur...

The Process of the Cosmos

Philosophical Theology and Cosmology

by Anthony B. Kelly

05/01/1999

This thesis argues that with the advance of scientific knowledge, particularly in cosmology, Natural Theology can now provide an answer to the question as to the reason for the existence of man and the world. Aristotle had reasoned from the contingency of the world to the necessity of a God. He had also concluded that the world was unworthy of God's concern, as God could not be concerned with a world which was significantly different from God himself. Aristotle's reasoning from the world up to God, together with his inability to reason down from God to the world, established an antinomy. The history of subsequent attempts to avoid this antinomy, and to provide an explanation for the existence of the world, is considered. No such attempt is found to be successful. A hidden assumpti...

by William Schmitt

08/15/2001

Adrienne von Speyr in her book "Confession" and throughout her writings speaks of the "confession" of Jesus Christ. This is a startling use of the term because Christ never sinned. The author examines all the writings of von Speyr in the light of Roman Catholic soteriology and sacramental theology and in view of the influences that existed between her and Hans Urs von Balthasar. The author then shows how the theme of confession is central to von Speyr's writing, aids in illuminating her theology of Holy Saturday and the Paschal Mystery, and serves as the basis for the renewal of the sacrament of confession.