Disabled Literature

A Critical Examination of the Portrayal of Individuals with Disabilities in Selected Works of Modern and Contemporary American Literature

by Miles Beauchamp, Wendy Chung, Alijandra Mogilner, & Svetlana Zakinova

06/30/2015

This book examines how authors have used characters with disabilities to elicit emotional reactions in readers; additionally, how writers use disabilities to present individuals as "the other" rather than simply as people. Finally, the book discusses how literature has changed, or is changing, with regards to its presentation of those with a disability.

Kafka's The Metamorphosis

Unwelcome at Home

by John P. Anderson

03/12/2016

Fresh from the magic kingdom of Joyce's Finnegans Wake, this non-academic author ushers us line-by-line into the shadows of Kafka's spectral bug theater. He walks the bug back along hints left by Kafka as to what happened the night before, why that night was different from all other nights. In this reading, father Samsa betrayed his first-born and needy son Gregor by declaring him unwelcome at home, even though Gregor was paying the rent. Stimulated by this betrayal of blood by blood, the twilight zone opened momentarily allowing father's brutality to transform the son into a giant bug. Three months later, the combined protective forces of Easter and Passover are necessary to finally put the creature to rest: Easter for his spirit and Passover for his bug body. Using then-current form...

Book 7 of Caesar's Bellum Gallicum

With Introduction, Text, Vocabulary and Notes

by Drew Arlen Mannetter, PhD.

08/30/2004

This comprehensive reader utilizes a step-by-step approach to help students of Latin read and understand the longest and most dramatic book of Caesar's Gallic War. Book 7 is the culmination of the conflict between Gaul, led by the young Arvernian Vercingetorix and fighting for its freedom and political survival, and the Romans, led by Julius Caesar and fighting for hegemony and political mastery. The final battle at Alesia, pitting the united might of Gaul at 339,000 men against a Roman army of 40,000, changed the course of Western history. This reader is ideal for Latin students of all levels who have a basic knowledge of grammar and morphology. The Latin text of all 90 chapters of Book 7 is broken down into manageable segments, normally about a sentence in length. Immediately following,...

Kafka's Last Pipes

The Burrow and Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk

by John P. Anderson

11/18/2016

Fresh from the twilight zone of Kafka's The Metamorphosis, this non-academic author treats on a line by line basis two of Kafka's last stories, stories written while he was wheezing with tuberculosis. Not surprisingly, these stories features pipes, just what Kafka was thinking about all the time while he was bed ridden, his sore pipes. Kafka experienced the threat of death at the same time as he experienced the love of his life with Dora Diamant. In these two stories Kafka spot-lights fear and love, the most basic human issues and those that had taken possession of Kafka's life. Fear and love in the lives of a mole-like creature alone in a burrow and mice in a crowded colony. In stories with no humans, Kafka teaches us what is most important in being human. The Burrow examines fear-based...

FACS - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

Remaking Reality - Eroding the Palimpsest - Volume 10, 2007-2008

by Jill Kriegel and Emmanuel Alvarado, et al.

04/08/2009

IN THIS ISSUE: Foreword EMMANUEL ALVARADO Artist’s Commentary CYNTHIA ZAITZ Indelible Ink of the Palimpsest: Language, Myth and Narrative in H.D.’s Trilogy MICHELE BRAUN Mary-ing Isis and Mary Magdalene in “The Flowering of the Rod”: Revisioning and Healing Through Female-Centered Spirituality in H.D.’s Trilogy JULIE GOODSPEED-CHADWICK Rethinking the Maya: Understanding an Ancient Language in Modern Linguistic Terms RHIANNA C. ROGERS Monarch of All I Can Sway: “Crusoeing” Alongside Oscar Wilde’s “The Decay of Lying” VAL CZERNY Mina Loy’s Design Flaws COLBEY EMMERSON REID Form and Function in the Social Perception and Appreciation of Web Sites EMMANUEL ALVARADO In Of Cigarettes, High Heels, and Other Interesting Things: An Introduc...

FACS - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

Catastrophe and Representation - Volume 9, 2006-2007

by Peggy Schaller, et al.

11/15/2007

IN THIS ISSUE: Foreword PEGGY SCHALLER Saisir le désordre: Expressions littéraires de la catastrophe; modalités et enjeux de sa verbalisation AMINA TAHRI The Lesson of the Titanic BREE HOSKIN Places That Disaster Leave Behind BRUCE JANZ Nuclear Families and Nuclear Catastrophe in Alain Resnais’ Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959) PAUL WILLIAMS Personal History, Collective History: Mapping Shock and the Work of Analogy AMANDA IRWIN WILKINS It’s What Isn’t There That Is: Catastrophe, Denial, and Non-Representation in Arshile Gorky’s Art KIM THERIAULT The editors of the Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies literary journal invite submissions on any topic for upcoming issues. FACS is an interdisciplinary journal providing a forum for comparative study in the arts, humani...

by Joseph Greco

12/20/1999

Robert Siodmak, who is considered the master of film noir thrillers and crime melodramas, has long been seen as a mere "assignment director," never an artist in complete control of his work. J. Greco's study of Siodmak's Hollywood career dispels this view and presents a unique perspective on the studio system and the director who used cunning to get his own way within it. He incorporates both archival evidence and stylistic analysis to show a distinct correlation between the production histories of Siodmak's studio films and the director's central artistic purpose. Shedding new light on the career of this important film maker, this book is worthwhile reading for the film scholar, the lover of film noir, and the fan of Siodmak's work.

Working on Texts

Reading Literature Critically

by Enrico Terrinoni

06/29/2012

If reading is inevitably always an experiment, reading literary masterpieces gains one access to a linguistic and semiotic universe that baffles hermeneutic authority, as well as any attempt to propose definitive interpretations. What is good about reading is that it is simultaneously a statement of subjectivity and recognition of the other as a different interpreter of the same signs. Every reading is therefore always provisional. Working on Texts provides some old and new readings of famous literary masterpieces by authors such as John Donne, S.T. Coleridge, Walt Whitman, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Seamus Heaney.

Learning Self-Therapy Through Writing

An experience in Creative Journaling

by Nathaniel Gadsden

03/13/2001

This book designed for self-discovery and self-empowerment. The journal explores three basic questions, who am I, what can I do, and what do I want to do? Then the book challenges you to get started today. The journal is unique because it guides you through very creative but simple excercises that help you visualize your inner most thoughts and fears, while empowering you to move forward. The journal can be used for group interaction and individual counseling sessions. The journal also contains a section devoted to those persons that are affected by drug/alcohol abuse. The weekly self-contract section and the monthly flushing sessions are great tools that can be used by teens and adults alike.

Marginal Voice, Marginal Body

The Treatment Of The Human Body in yhe Works of Nakagami Kenji, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Salman Rushdie

by Noriko Miura

08/25/2000

In examining the work of three "ethnic" writers (Nakagami Kenji is Japanese burakumin, Leslie Marmon Silko Native American, Salman Rushdie an Indian living in England), this project studies the literary depictions of the ways in which the body is portrayed and used as a space for cultural and ideological inscription. The major issues addressed involve gender, race, and ethnicity as forces which become visible through the socially constructed body. In the works of Nakagami Kenji, Salman Rushdie, and Leslie Marmon Silko, bodies cry out the silence to overwhelm the torturer. They all share a concern with the loss of land which induces migration, a weakened sense of identity, and hybridity. Each author uses the body of his/her protagonist as the site to inscribe the consequences of such l...

The Sound and the Fury in the Garden of Eden

William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury and the Garden of Eden Myth

by John P. Anderson

02/02/2002

This non-academic author brings the Garden of Eden myth alive as sophisticated poetry and a polemic for women and the consciousness of freedom. The myth is explored line by line using the tools of literary analysis and modern ideas, including Freudian concepts. The analysis shows how its "J" author, thought to be a woman in the royal court of Judah around 1000 BCE, uses the techniques of sound association, puns and other sophisticated means to get her messages across. The analysis probes how after thousands of years this myth still speaks to us about the critical human experiences of sex and death and their bigger brothers freedom and limitation. Then this author shows how Faulkner used concepts from the Garden of Eden in structuring his most stunning and difficult stream of consciou...

by John P. Anderson

07/09/2002

An analysis of Faulkner's novel Light in August based on the death of his daughter, Alabama.

Finding Joy in Joyce

A Readers Guide to Ulysses

by John P. Anderson

02/01/2000

This is a detailed reader's guide to James Joyce's masterwork Ulysses, voted the most important novel of the 20th century. The guide provides episode by episode an in depth explanation of the action and symbolism, including a description of the related books of Homer's Odyssey and the correspondences. This guide is designed to give the user the keys to the kingdom of one of the wonders of Western civilization. The non-academic author, a retired lawyer and life long Joyce reader, brings new approaches to find the deep meaning of each of Joyce's episodes and the novel as a whole. The scope of this effort, the complete Joyce, is unique in an area monopolized by more narrowly focused academics. The analysis elucidates Joyce's technique to mimic patterns in history and nature in his arch...

Nichiren's Nationalism

A Buddhist Rhetoric of a Shinto Teaching

by Achilles S C Gacis

08/25/2000

Chapter One, "Religion and Nationalism in Early Kamakura Society" introduces the issues that affected the nation in the early Kamakura period. The first section points out the historical background of the time that was considered to be a spiritually significant age according to Buddhist chronology. The next section on the "Religious Answers to National Problems" provides a prelude to how the indigenous religious tradition of Shinto attempted to define its leaders and their right to rule as well as the divine protection that was to be given them by the native deities. The imported Buddhist teachings provided a new perspective to the national problems through an examination of existing conditions as possibly being consequences of immoral acts. The various characteristics of the teaching...

Diary as Fiction

Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground and Turgenev’s Diary of a Superfluous Man

by Jessica M. Natale

09/21/2000

There is a genre of literature in which the work is purposely written within the diary format; this type of writings known as diary fiction. Diary novels traditionally reflect what the authors think real diaries are or are written as a parody of the diary as a negative model. The authors of diary novels choose the diary form because its artistic quality expresses a greater sense of immediacy to the reader than other forms of literature. The diary novel emphasizes the time of writing rather than the time that it is written about, so the diarist usually writes about events of the immediate past - events that occur between one entry and the next - or records his momentary ideas, reflections, or emotions. Turgenev's "Diary of a Superfluous Man" represents the marriage of a memoir and a di...

Dostoevsky's Conception Of Man

Its Impact on Philosophical Anthropology

by Peter M. Wolf

09/19/1997

Dostoevsky's novels have contributed to a conception of man that reverberates in the conclusions of prominent twentieth-century philosophical anthropologists. Max Scheler, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Albert Camus, among others, have admitted that the works of Dostoevsky had an influence on the manner in which they learned to conceive of human nature and the world in which humans live. Our aim in this dissertation is to ask: what is there in the novels of Dostoevsky concerning the nature of man, of which certain philosophers could claim that in their philosophical conceptions of man they were positively influenced by him? The main thesis is substantiated with a careful analysis of four novels: Notes From the House of the Dead (Zapiski iz mertvo...

The Moral of the Story

Content, Process, and Reflection in Moral Education through Narratives

by John H. Lockwood

01/31/1999

The problem this project attempts to solve is to develop a workable moral education in light of the clash between religious forms of moral education and U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning them. The concept of story and storytelling has been suggested as a unifying focus for disparate prescriptions for moral education. Several recent approaches to moral storytelling have been proposed. The approaches of William Bennett, Nel Noddings, and Herbert Kohl are among those which have attempted to combine moral education and storytelling within the last decade. Bennett is identified with other theorists whose primary concern is the moral content of a story. Noddings is identified as a process theorist, whose primary concern is the process of moral storytelling, not the content. Kohl is i...

The Cross, the Plow and the Skyline

Contemporary Science Fiction and the Ecological Imagination

by Ernest J. Yanarella

04/30/2001

The apocalyptic, pastoral, and urban traditions have fundamentally shaped Western history and influenced American religion, culture, and politics. This book argues that these traditions have not only been decisive in giving form and substance to classic and modern American literature, but have been appropriated by contemporary science fiction. As a loosely connected set of cultural narratives, the Cross, the Plow, and the Skyline have through the medium of science fiction provided a bold vista on the future grounded in an emergent ecological imagination. This challenging vision, the author claims, may yet settle into the New Millennium's cultural consciousness and inform an ecological politics dedicated to confronting the nation's and the world's social and environmental problems. T...

by Beat Affentranger

05/30/2000

This is a revisionist study of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century satires on science with an emphasis on the writings of Jonathan Swift and, to a lesser degree, Samuel Butler and other satirists. To say, as some literary commentators do, that the satirists attacked only pseudo-scientists who failed to employ the empirical method properly is to beg a crucial question: how could the satirists possibly have distinguished the genuine scientist from the crank? By a failsafe set of Baconian principles perhaps? No, the matter is more complicated. I read the satiric literature on early modern science against a totally different understanding of what science is, how it came into being, and how it developed. Satire has a decided advantage over scientific discourse. It can rely on common sense; sci...

The Plays of Christopher Marlowe and George Peele

Rhetoric and Renaissance Sensibility

by Brian B. Ritchie

08/15/1999

This work is concerned with the evaluation of rhetoric as an essential aspect of Renaissance sensibility. It is an analysis of the Renaissance world viewed in terms of literary style and aesthetic. Eight plays are analysed in some detail: four by George Peele: The Battle of Alcazar, Edward I, David and Bethsabe, and The Arraignment of Paris; and four by Christopher Marlowe: Dido Queen of Carthage, Tamburlaine Part One, Dr Faustus and Edward II. The work is thus partly a comparative study of two important Renaissance playwrights; it seeks to establish Peele in particular as an important figure in the history and evolution of the theatre. Verbal rhetoric is consistently linked to an analysis of the visual, so that the reader/viewer is encouraged to assess the plays holistically, as unif...

J. Henry Shorthouse, "The Author of John Inglesant"

(with reference to T. S. Eliot and C. G. Jung)

by Charles W. Spurgeon

06/06/2003

When J. Henry Shorthouse (1834-1903) published John Inglesant in 1881, he contributed a unique synthesis of Anglo-Catholic sensibilities to the enduring legacy of the Oxford Movement. Although his "philosophical romance" has been acclaimed "the greatest Anglo-Catholic novel in English literature" and "the one English novel that speaks immediately to human intuition without regard to the reader's own faith or philosophy", his most enduring contributions are the "religion of John Inglesant", an Anglo-Catholic synthesis of obedience and freedom, faith and reason, and the sacramental vision of "the myth of Little Gidding". The popular success of John Inglesant transformed the quiet, middle-class, Birmingham manufacturer into "the author of John Inglesant", apologi...

Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse

A Reading of Four Contemporary Taiwanese Writers

by Li-fen Chen

12/20/1999

This dissertation is an attempt to define a Chinese "modernism," exemplified by the narrative practices of four major writers in Taiwan today, from the perspective of comparative literature and recent development of literary theory. I propose that modernity of Taiwanese fiction is not so much a result of Western influences as an evolution of Chinese narrative tradition itself. To argue my point I delineate a poetics of Chinese narrative, from which I devise a method of reading and a criterion of evaluation for contemporary Taiwanese fiction in defining its achievement and historical significance. This study of Taiwanese fiction also aims at providing a better understanding of fundamental aesthetic assumptions of Western "modernism" in the context of its own literary tradition. Chapter One...

Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!

Uncertainty in Dixie

by John P. Anderson

09/28/2003

A reader's guide to William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!

Master Players in a Fixed Game

An Extra-Literary History of Twentieth Century African-American Authors

by Ralph D. Story

04/30/2001

The literary expression of Afro-Americans has been scrutinized and criticized in exhaustive detail, yet historically perceived by many American and English literary scholars as qualitatively and quantitatively underdeveloped. This was the view held by many literary scholars until the late 1960s when Afro-American literary scholars and black students argued forcefully and convincingly in favor of the plays, short stories, poetry and novels written by Afro-Americans. Despite such noteworthy efforts, however, few scholars have investigated the uneven and sporadic appearance of publications, or the absence of publications, by black writers in any comprehensive fashion. Thus, the dissertation examines the various extra-literary problems faced by Afro-American writers which have contributed to e...

by Christine M. Gibson

10/11/2000

Has 20th century literary technique been influenced by the cinema? The obvious answer is yes. But with that answer few specific examples are ever provided, frustrating the reader and filmgoer alike. This study does give specifics drawn from the novels, short stories and screenplays of Argentine writer Beatriz Guido (1925-1988), wife of noted film director Leopoldo Torre Nilsson. Cinematic narrative techniques and literary narrative techniques share features in common, a mutual influence, but also important differences. Here these are examined in detail. Students and fans of film and Latin American literature will be intrigued.

Flaubert's Madame Bovary

The Zen Novel

by John P. Anderson

01/25/2004

This non-academic author has previously brought you reader’s guides to the depths and subtle pleasures of works by Joyce and Faulkner. With this book he brings you to the ultimate pleasures of Gustave Flaubert’s masterpiece. This author treats Madame Bovary as the Zen novel, working on the reader in the same way Zen works on a disciple. He shows how Flaubert uses a radically new style in order to create a literary breakthrough of a similar order as Zen and has composed the ultimate music of this novel in the counterpoint of style and plot. The style of the novel is grounded in Zen-like detachment and freedom whereas the plot is mired in desire, illusion and determinism. In the plot the inevitable demise of Madame Bovary is driven by her passionate nature and correspondi...

by Ricardo Navarrete Franco

12/07/1997

The difference between "mass" and "mess," for example, says a lot about the distinctive capacity of phonemes and the alphabet, but very little about the many similarities in these two words. It follows that there is something not exactly alphabetical in language that is prompted by similarities like these. Even quotidian reading exhibits non-alphabetic ingredients, for instance when we skip spelling mistakes or typographical errors; i.e.: when we impose analogies over differences, hermeneutics over semiology, semasiography over the alphabet. Joyce, who once commented that "a few letters will do if you can't read a whole word," just incorporates another system of writing to his "cyclical history," very much in keeping with Vico's idea that each cycle has its ow...

Johnson's Quarrel with Swift

Johnson's Part in the Swiftian Tradition

by Jordan P. Richman

07/27/2010

Samuel Johnson included in his Lives of the Poets a "Life of Jonathan Swift." His friends, including his biographer, believed he had formed a prejudice against Swift's life and works. They were relieved to find that Johnson's biography of Swift was fair and judicious, indeed. This dissertation shows the parallels, as well as divergences, between the two writers in satire, political thought, and theological philosophy.

by John P. Anderson

03/18/2010

This third in a series continues this non-academic author's ground-breaking word by word analysis of James Joyce's Finnegans Wake, Joyce's last blessing on mankind. This volume covers chapters 1.5 and 1.6 with the intent to explore them as art objects, to examine how they work as art. By contrast with previous reduction-based chapters, Chapter 1.5 features expansion, One becoming Many. The spirit of the female principle registered in ALP's letter or "mamafesta" hatches the expansion. This chapter honors creativity in literature along with the human female instinct for giving birth to new human potential. An academically-oriented Professor explores but misses the meaning of the letter. Aristotle's concept of the infinite and the legend of Krishna injecting independence in Gopi milk w...

Joyce's Finnegans Wake

The Curse of Kabbalah Volume 5

by John P. Anderson

10/05/2011

This fifth in a series continues this non-academic author's attempts to decode on a word-by-word basis all of Joyce's Finnegans Wake. This volume covers chapter 2.2, generally considered the most difficult of chapters, with the intent to explore Joyce's novel as an art object. This difficult chapter takes us through the human psychosexual journey of the first 12 years. This journey, critical to the development of the full human spirit, is a pothole-ridden ride from infant dependency at the breast to breezy adolescent independence in puberty, from the stroller to the "hot rod." This Freud induced chapter flags the pot holes along the way and the flats they can cause. The goal of the journey is independence and new possibilities while the flats cancel the trip and the child stays at home. ...