Grounded Theory

The Philosophy, Method, and Work of Barney Glaser

by Vivian B. Martin and Astrid Gynnild (editors)

12/28/2011

This anthology provides a unique collection of articles on classic grounded theory, as developed by sociologist Dr. Barney G. Glaser. Organized in four sections, teaching grounded theory, techniques, history and philosophy, and advanced approaches, the 19 chapters fill gaps and correct misunderstandings about the method. Chapters on the merits of classic grounded theory over other versions, the historical and philosophical influences on the method, and advice for Ph.D. students doing classic grounded theory dissertations will be useful to novice and experienced researchers. How-to chapters on the use of focus groups, online interviews, and video for data collection expand data possibilities, while articles on formal theory, software, and testing concepts with structural equation modeling w...

Revolution as Development

The Karen Self-Determination Struggle Against Ethnocracy (1949 - 2004)

by Jack Fong, Ph.D.

04/11/2008

The Karen Revolution for self-determination has the distinction of being one of the world's longest-running struggles for freedom, having begun in 1949 and continuing to this very moment. This sociological work makes visible how ethnopolitical, petropolitical, geopolitical, and ecosystemic issues affect the political economy of a people experiencing ethnic cleansing. From the inception of its self-determination struggle in 1949, readers will be taken on a historical journey with the Karen, finally "arriving" in the 21st century. Along the way, the author exposes readers to the anatomy of how Karen revolutionary dynamics attempt to shield the Karen people against internal colonization committed by the various military regimes of Burma, and how these complex dynamics engaged by Karen revolut...

by Gordon L. Patzer

04/20/2006

The Power and Paradox of Physical Attractiveness is a scholarly look into physical attractiveness. It articulates the great importance placed on this dimension of a person’s appearance. Analysis of the dynamics and consequences reveals a powerful, pervasive, and frequently unrecognized or denied physical attractiveness phenomenon. This phenomenon transcends time, geography, and culture, regardless of demographics and socioeconomics of individuals and populations. With penetrating vision, Dr. Patzer provides evidence that despite professed ideals, people do judge others by their looks. Physical attractiveness is a more powerful determinant of a person’s fortune and misfortune in life than people admit. No matter the words, thoughts, and ideals proclaimed by people, these same people ...

by Pamela S. Haley

07/30/2013

This dissertation concerns the structures and individual agency of Filipina brides who met their American husbands through Internet or pen pal advertisements. Popular media, legal scholars, and some feminists have largely described the phenomenon in terms of its oppressiveness toward the women involved, thus dismissing any agency on the part of the women. Similarly, much of the scholarship has located the American Internet grooms as ogres who are out to exploit these women for domestic and sexual services. If prominent researchers of this phenomenon are correct in their assessments that Filipina Internet brides operate as effective agents, then one also assumes these women continue that agency when they settle into their new lives as Filipina wives married to American men. Therefore, my c...

The Knowledge-Based Economy

Modeled, Measured, Simulated

by Loet Leydesdorff

09/25/2006

How can an economy based on something as volatile as knowledge be sustained? The urgency of improving our understanding of a knowledge-based economy provides the context and necessity of this study. In a previous study entitled A Sociological Theory of Communications: The Self-Organization of the Knowledge-based Society (2001) the author specified knowledge-based systems from a sociological perspective. In this book, he takes this theory one step further and demonstrates how the knowledge base of an economic system can be operationalized, both in terms of measurement and by providing simulation models. The measurement instruments are applied to the German and Dutch economies and elaborated in terms of regional and sectorial differences. The knowledge base is specified in th...

America's Prisons

The Movement Toward Profit and Privatization

by Curtis R. Blakely

02/01/2005

This reader introduces the student to prison management. Particular interest is given the increased role of profit in the application of punishment. Profit and prison privatization are viewed within their larger context. As such, public and private prison operations are compared. Part of this comparison takes place through situating each sector upon an ideological continuum. This placement helps indicate the direction being taken by the contemporary prison. It further reveals that tomorrow's prisons may be less driven by traditional objectives and more driven by the notions of profit and efficiency.

by Gregory Shafer

08/15/2005

Social scientists are only beginning to question the idea of culture and the way it comes to be part of who we are as a people. While most would suggest that culture emanates from our values and traditions, this book wonders if it is given to us by corporations, media, and political institutions as a way to keep us docile and compliant. So much of what we do, how we dress, and what we value is actually a manifestation of government propaganda and advertising. And so, we embrace sentimental notions about our founding fathers, about marriage, our political system, and time honored rituals. While we think of ourselves as free, we are deluged with messages from powerful conglomerates who want us to dress and act a certain way and who have clear agendas for what they want us to believe about o...

Midlife Mavericks

Women reinventing their lives in Mexico

by Karen Blue

08/08/2000

Midlife Mavericks chronicles a new trend--unmarried American and Canadian women building better lives for themselves in Mexico's beautiful colonial villages. Cozy up on a comfortable couch and share a margarita with successful women who have found an alternative to high-stress careers. Sip a glass of wine with empty-nesters seeking adventure and drink a glass of ice tea with retirees living in comfort on just their Social Security or disability income. You'll laugh and cry with these gutsy gringas as they journey from unfulfilled yearnings towards answers each woman must ultimately discover for herself. "Like the seafaring sirens, Midlife Mavericks, will lure reticent readers from their lukewarm existences into lives of discovery and purpose." Marilyn Davis, aut...

The Politics of Crystal Meth

Gay Men Share Stories of Addiction and Recovery

by Kenneth Cimino

11/22/2005

A non-profit executive, governmental employee, financial advisor, travel agent, student, fashion designer - what these gay men have in common is a knowledge of pain, obsession, despair, degradation, and finally freedom from the one element that connects their stories: crystal meth use. Dr. Ken Cimino reveals the intimate and horrifying nature of meth abuse and presents ten inspiring true life dramas of meth use and recovery in The Politics of Crystal Meth: Gay Men Share Personal Stories of Addiction and Recovery. In part one he illustrates the varied reasons why gay men use methamphetamines, from gay oppression to homophobia to building self esteem to HIV issues. In the second part of the book he shares ten personal and motivating stories of meth use and recovery. In The Politics of...

Working the Affect Shift

Latina Service Workers in U.S. Film

by Steve Nava

12/01/2011

Working the Affect Shift explores the changing U.S. racial and political economic context of Latina working-class film and media images, and how Ethnic, Cultural, Film, and Feminist Studies have contributed to sociologically understanding them. We can rethink our orientation to so-called “stereotypes” by focusing on our forward-looking, positive neoliberal ideology as related to our "national forgetting of collective racial injury." Each film and media image analyzed herein offers an example of how the fraught relational matrices of race, class, gender, and sexual identities continue to shape national politics despite our national commitment (on the political Right and Left) to "multiculturalism." Using Latina service workers as examples, this volume offers ways to think productive...

Currents of Thought in African Sociology and the Global Community

How to Understand Research Findings in the Context of Sociological Perspectives

by Joshua Adekunle Awosan

09/01/2009

Currents of Thought in African Sociology and the Global Community focuses on research findings further enriched in the realm of the emergent, indigenous African sociology within a global context. An authentic guide, it has potential to expose readers to the intricacy of research in its various ramifications. Its uniqueness consists in casting, in an explanatory framework, what each of the subdisciplines of sociology is all about, while simultaneously discussing the theoretical and methodological orientations in which the accompanying research findings are situated. The transition of sociology in Africa, inextricably tied in with global dimension, is its major theme. And discussion questions/exercises and essays at the end of each chapter constitute a stimulating teaching tool. Its theore...

Living under Liberalism

The Politics of Depression in Western Democracies

by Pam Stavropoulos

01/31/2008

Depression is prevalent throughout western society. But while identifying "risk factors," we rarely make the link to the liberal value system which so shapes the society in which we live. Freedom; equality; progress; respect for the "individual." What's wrong with liberalism? As residents of western liberal democracies, aren't we living in the type of society most conducive to happiness? Intellectually, we like to think so. We intone the liberal mantra "rationality defines a person," "my life is up to me," "liberalism is the best there is." But there are parts of ourselves that suspect otherwise, and that remain unconvinced. We become symptomatic. This book challenges individualist readings of depression which are still so dominant in western societies. This is in professional circles an...

Interpersonal Acceptance and Rejection

Social, Emotional, and Educational Contexts

by Elias Kourkoutas and Fatos Erkman (editors)

02/25/2011

Interpersonal Acceptance and Rejection: Social, Emotional, and Educational Contexts draws on research to offer a global perspective on issues of fundamental importance to family functioning, childhood development, and adult intimate relationships, as well as to policy and practice for children, adolescents, couples, and families at risk. It draws on the perspectives of major social science disciplines such as clinical and educational psychology, anthropology, psychology, special education, and sociology, thus ensuring topics are discussed within broad theoretical frameworks. The authors cover a wide spectrum of questions and topics in relation to perceived acceptance and rejection by significant others. Chapters are set in the context of worldwide trends in the area of interpersonal accept...

The Lunisolar Calendar

A Sociology of Japanese Time

by Jessica Kennett Cork

06/25/2011

This study shall explore the social and political significance of the so-called kyureki, the Japanese lunisolar calendar that was abolished by the Meiji government in 1872. This calendar was the principal method of timekeeping in Japan from 604 to 1872, but has received little attention from English speaking scholars. This study argues that the study of the lunisolar calendar is essential to gaining a comprehensive understanding of pre-Meiji society and political history. Chapter 1 uses a detailed analysis of an actual lunisolar calendar coupled with passages from pre-Meiji historical and literary texts to show that the lunisolar calendar reflects the value pre-Meiji society placed on minute seasonal changes, the phases of the moon, and divination controlled by various directional deities...

The Coordinated Management of a Culturally Diffused Identity

Internationally Adopted People and the Narrative Burden of Self

by Jeffrey J. Leinaweaver

09/01/2011

Internationally adopted persons confront multiple challenges in constructing their identities. This study of the narrative burden of self looks at and interprets the dynamic process in which internationally adopted people develop, coordinate and manage their sense of self, identity and cultural/racial personhood. Drawing on the theory of the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM), the study focuses on their use of orphaning and adoption stories to most skillfully position and tell one's origin story in concert with one's internal sense of self, and the pressures and forces found in interpersonal and intercultural dialogue. The research reveals how internationally adopted people develop and demonstrate varying levels of game mastery in managing societal scripts and oppressive frames of st...

by Haim Mazar

09/13/2009

This thesis analyses how and why culture and geography influence the allocation and licensing of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum in different nations. Based on a broad comparative study of 235 countries, an inter-disciplinary approach is used to explore regulatory frameworks and attitudes toward risk. In addition, detailed case studies of the UK, France, the US and Ecuador provide deeper insights into the main contrasting regulatory styles. Three alternative sociological theories are used to analyse and explain the results for both the in-depth and broad brush studies. The Cultural Theory of Mary Douglas and co-workers is first used to categorise countries in terms of perceptual filters. The empirical findings indicate some countries to be apparently exceptional in their behaviour. Th...

Modern Nature

Essays on Environmental Communication

by Luke Strongman

07/05/2012

This book presents ten essays about environmental communication. Chapter one introduces the concept of environmental communication and the ways in which it was conceived, imagined, and developed as a form of interdisciplinary enquiry. Chapter two explores the concept of green communication and education for the sustainable development movement. Chapter three is concerned with one of the major underlying socio-cultural influences of the human/nature divide: that of anthropomorphic or anthropogenic reasoning. Chapter four takes an ecological view of economics and develops an argument for the place of economic intangibles in the modern political economy. Chapters five and six explore specialist aspects of environmental communication practices: Chapter five is concerned with the contexts of ps...

Supersizing Science

On Building Large-Scale Research Projects in Biology

by Niki Vermeulen

10/13/2010

In recent years there has been a clear rise in scientific collaboration, as well as in studies on the subject. While most scholars examine disciplines traditionally known to be collaborative, such as physics and space research, this book focuses on biology. It investigates the growing collaboration in the life sciences, or the emergence of what is called 'big biology'. While the Human Genome Project is often presented as the first large-scale research project in biology, cooperation in the life sciences has a longer history. A comparison between centralised 'big physics' and 'big biology' reveals how the latter has a networked structure, which evolved in interaction with the integration of information and communication technologies. By concentrating on the construction of these networks, t...

The Challenge of Scientometrics

The Development, Measurement, and Self-Organization of Scientific Communications

by Loet Leydesdorff

03/13/2001

Scientometrics--the quantitative study of scientific communication--challenges science and technology studies by demonstrating that organized knowledge production and control is amenable to measurement. First, the various dimensions of the empirical study of the sciences are clarified in a methodological analysis of theoretical traditions, including the sociology of scientific knowledge and neo-conventionalism in the philosophy of science. Second, the author argues why the mathematical theory of communication enables us to address crucial problems in science and technology studies, both on the qualitative side (e.g., the significance of a reconstruction) and on the quantitative side (e.g., the prediction of indicators). A comprehensive set of probabilistic entropy measures for stu...

The State of Emergency Management 2000

The Process of Emergency Management Professionalization in the United States and Florida

by Jennifer L. Wilson

04/30/2001

This dissertation analyzes the current status of emergency management professionalization in the United States and Florida using a qualitative case study. I investigate the efforts of various organizations at the national and state levels in the private and public sectors to organize emergency management as a profession. I conceptualize emergency management professionalization as occurring in two phases: the indirect institutionalization of the occupation of emergency management and the formal advancement toward an emergency management profession. The legislative, organizational, and procedural developments that occurred between approximately 1900 and the late 1970s became the indirect institutionalization of the occupation of emergency management. Over time, as our society developed a...

The Politics of Death

A Sociological Analysis of Revolutionary Communication

by Michael J. Blain,

05/23/2001

This dissertation reports the results of a sociological analysis of the narrative form and functions of revolutionary discourse. Chapter I poses two questions: How do representations of death function in political processes? How do signifiers of violent death function in the structure of revolutionary statements? Chapter II reviews relevant sociological concepts and articulates a dramatistic political-sociology of death, concepts mainly derived from Emile Durkheim, Robert Hertz, and Arnold van Gennep on death and the sacred, Max Weber on violence and politics, and Burke, Duncan, and Edelman's view of politics as symbolic action. Chapter III presents the results of a formal, narrative, and semiotic analysis of a large sample of revolutionary statements ( Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Foucault...

Towards the Formation of a Sustainable South Florida

An Analysis of Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building in the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative

by Arthur Oyola-Yemaiel

08/29/2000

This dissertation examines the sociological process of conflict resolution and consensus building in South Florida Everglades Ecosystem Restoration through what I define as a Network Management Coordinative Interstitial Group (NetMIG). The process of conflict resolution can be summarized as the participation of interested and affected parties (stakeholders) in a forum of negotiation. I study the case of the Governor's Commission for a Sustainable South Florida (GCSSF) that was established to reduce social conflict. Such conflict originated from environmental disputes about the Everglades and was manifested in the form of gridlock among regulatory (government) agencies, Indian tribes, as well as agricultural, environmental conservationist and urban development interests. The purpose of t...

by Roy Hamilton

11/26/1999

The effect of video and written modeling on self-efficacy of 70 master's degree students enrolled in their first techniques course was investigated. The ability to understand and use reflection of content, feeling, and meaning was presented to the experimental group through videotaped instruction and examples and the control group through written instruction and examples. Facts about reflecting skills, which included information and three vignettes, demonstrated the use of the skills. Through two pilot studies, the Reflecting Skills Questionnaire (RSQ) developed for this study showed convergent validity with the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE). Participants' indication of self-efficacy for the reflection of content, feeling, and meaning was assessed by the RSQ. A t - test wa...

Cultural Values and the Family beyond Year 2000

Principles, Policies and Reality

by Jacob K. Hevi

07/28/2002

Culture is dynamic. But in cultural (ethnic) groups certain elements of culture such as cultural values relating to the family are regarded indispensable for social order, and therefore for the survival of the society. Accordingly those concerned strive to maintain social order by rediscovering what they regard as traditional cultural values. The thesis of this study is: the process of the development of cultural values relating to the family can be defined as "Spiral Involution"; namely a development through interparticipative stages, each stage (past or present) participating in the other, as impulse to further development. Therefore the proposition of this study is: dialogal-value-system-concordance, a conscious intervention by those concerned through dialogue towards optimal social ord...

Reframing the Attitude-Behavior Debate

The Case of Meat-Abstinence in Vegetarian Student Cooperatives

by James A. Kitts

09/18/1997

This thesis proposes a reconceptualization of the "attitude" as a multidimensional latent process, which may be unstable across situations, individuals, and time. A review of the literature in light of this reconceptualization reveals aspects of the survey situation that may systematically influence measures of attitudes, behaviors, and social norms. This suggests that contradictory findings regarding attitude-behavior consistency may be partly due to specific inadequacies of conventional measures. A reflexive research strategy is proposed, which supplements survey methods with both quantitative and qualitative assessments of measurement validity. This strategy is applied in a case study of attitudes, norms, and diet in five vegetarian student cooperative houses. Analyses test the suf...

The Early Conservation Movement in Argentina and the National Park Service

A Brief History of Conservation, Development, Tourism and Sovereignty

by Arthur Oyola-Yemaiel

08/29/2000

This study explores the emergence and development of the conservation movement in Argentina during the twentieth century. I argue that the development of the conservation movement has been linked to shifts in the broader spectrum of Argentina's political arena as well as the international political situation as nations competed for the sovereignty of newly acquired territories after the Indian Wars. This book explores the development of Argentina as a nation in relation to conservation of its natural resources as a counter measure to resource extraction. Thus, I establish the relationship between the need for national sovereignty and socio-economic development via the formulation of nature based tourism industry. This strategy was developed by Excequiel Bustillo and spearhe...

Eglise catholique et transactions politiques: l'Etat dans le discours social de l'Eglise au XXe siecle

(Catholic Church and Political Transactions: the State in 20th Century's Social Teaching of the the Church)

by Dariusz Góra

09/12/2001

The thesis examines the Catholic social teaching, as it is expressed in papal encyclicals, in wide context of contemporary political doctrines and major events of 20th century. The author proposes a method of following political messages of the Catholic Church during the last century. He challenges a standard Church's claim of immutability of its teaching. He shows, on the contrary, firm contextualisation both of Church's action and of its official message. From classical confrontational strategy face to modernity, through the attitude of "dialogue" during the Second Vatican Council, the Church insists on remaining a recognized participant of significant contemporary debates even in conditions of postmodernity.

by Nathan W. Pino

01/04/1998

The analysis reported here compares male and female rape reporting behavior. Results from an analysis of National Crime Survey data indicate that the characteristics of rape, and factors that influence a rape reporting decision, differ by sex, and that sex role socialization may largely influence the rape reporting decision for both males and females. Both men and women were more likely to report victimization when there was physical evidence, but only women were affected by such variables as the victim/offender relationship, the age of the offender, and whether or not the victimization was perceived to be completed. The analysis also found that women reported victimization more frequently than men, and that there were differences between male and female victims with respect to the char...

by Armida Salvati

09/11/2008

This book discusses altruism as a sociological category similar to the concept of social capital. The author explains why pro-social action is the basis for social capital, and analyzes sociological literature through authors in the field, including Elster, Axelrod, and Williams. Altruism and Social Capital should be read by researchers in sociology as well as students of general sociology and economic sociology. The author simply explains the relationship between altruism and rationality, particularly the kind of rationality produced by game theory. This volume discusses the most recent theories of pro-social action and social capital, and considers their economic consequences.

With and Without the White Coat

The Racialization of Southern California's Indian Physicians

by Lata Murti

01/09/2015

This study examines the role of occupational status in the racialization of Indian physicians in Southern California. Since the liberalization of U.S. immigration policy in 1965, the number of first and second-generation Indian doctors in the U.S. has grown to nearly seven percent of the nation's physician workforce; however, Indians constitute less than one percent of the total U.S. population. Overrepresented in one of America's most prestigious professions, Indians are more visible in U.S. medicine than in the U.S. at large. Previous scholarship in immigration research, Asian American Studies, and the sociology of occupations has paid little attention to these professional non-white immigrants and their racial experience in the U.S. Asian American Studies in particular has focused p...