Nothing New Under the Sun

An Introduction to Islam

by Paul Culp

09/24/2007

Islam draws more attention to itself with each passing day, but surprisingly few people know much about it, even in government, the media, education, and the Church. Nothing New Under the Sun is an accessible, up-to-date study of Islam’s past and present, with an acute analysis of its core logic and what that logic might mean for the future. Islam is a religion not just of scripture and tradition but also of community consensus, and it is not comprehensible without an examination of how that consensus is formed and the direction it is likely to take. Islam’s relationship to the West must also be understood in light of the contemporary Western religious climate - specifically the American one - which is failing badly as an alternative to the Islamist model. Nothing New Under the Sun...

Language, Reality, and Transcendence

An Essay on the Main Strands of Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy

by Ramesh Chandra Pradhan

10/02/2008

Language, Reality, and Transcendence deals with the later philosophy of Wittgenstein by delving into language, grammar, rule, self, world, culture, and value. Wittgenstein has given a comprehensive philosophy of man and the world and has dealt with the destiny of man by outlining the moral and the spiritual goals of human life. In this work, the nature of Wittgenstein's transcendent metaphysics of man and the ultimate reality has been outlined.

Christianity without the Cross

A History of Salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism

by Thomas A. Fudge

04/05/2003

Grounded in primary source research, this boldly revisionist book examines the doctrine of salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism (United Pentecostal Church) from its origins through its several developmental stages. The gradual rise of a literal interpretation of Acts 2.38 eliminated a tradition of doctrinal diversity within Oneness thought which regarded salvation as occurring at repentance prior to water and Spirit baptism. With this development a main link to the wider stream of evangelical Christianity was severed. The "water and Spirit" theology resulted in a form of Christianity which does not necessarily require the cross in any meaningful sense for salvation. This study recovers the lost theological tradition associated with important figures such as Howard A. Goss, A.D. Gurley, W.M....

by Jan G. Linn

06/26/2004

Silence may be golden, but not when it comes to the extremes of the Christian Right. That is why Jan Linn wrote his new book, What's Wrong With The Christian Right, just released by BrownWalker Press. As a former college and seminary teacher and author of ten previous books, Linn uses the Christian Right's own words and actions to show the extent to which it is trying to reshape both American politics and Christianity into its own image. The book describes in detail the agenda of the Christian Right, the tactics it employs, and the ways it plays loose with truth. It is also a call to action to everyone disturbed by the power and influence of the Christian Right. With careful documentation, this book exposes the extent to which the Christian Right is influencing American politics, who ...

GOD

A Psychological Assessment

by Gary M. Bakker

05/23/2013

What is God really like? What sort of personality does he have? What are his values and priorities? And who can best answer such questions? These are vital questions for anyone who wants to understand and please him, and so ensure an eternal future. But they are not philosophical or theological questions. They are about his psychology. Gary Bakker is a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience at answering these questions. He has studied God's words and deeds (his self-report and his behavior), found evidence of 16 psychological characteristics of God, and from these, reports some surprising conclusions. For example, if God has what we would regard as a diagnosable psychological problem, can it be treated? The 16 features/chapters that lead to an overall diagnosis and conclus...

by Michael A. Barber

11/27/2006

This is a highly controversial exposition of a doctrine which has dominated Christianity for two thousand years. The book takes apart, piece by piece, the very foundation that so many religions use to support the belief that there are three persons in one God. It analyses the major scriptural references pointed to in Trinity support texts, and examines them in the light of biblical context and by original-language comparisons. World-renowned authorities on biblical Hebrew and Greek are sought for their views on these key scriptures. This is a compelling book which turns the very foundation of Christianity onto its head.

Universal Theory

A Model for the Theory of Everything

by Mohsen Kermanshahi

05/31/2007

The intention of this work is to inform the non-specialist and the curious, who are intrigued by finding deeper understandings of our existence. With a clear, easily comprehensible and non-technical language, Universal Theory invites the layperson to join in the most exciting non-fictional adventure. It also welcomes the scientists who have reached roadblocks in their investigations and are willing to take a leap into the unexplored and often avoided areas of study. Universal Theory follows quantum mechanics' lead to challenge the boundaries between known physics and the unknown realm. "A new way of thinking or change in perspective may be needed to achieve a Theory of Everything and a true understanding of reality. Mohsen Kermanshashi has done an outstanding job in providing that new insi...

New Skins for Old Wine

Plato's Wisdom for Today's World

by Stephen C. Lovatt

06/05/2007

Most books of spirituality are far removed from intellectual rigor, and most books of philosophy are as dry as old bones. This volume seeks to bridge the gap. The author invites his readers to view the modern world through philosophical eyes as he relates Plato's words to issues such as friendship, human -rights, education, sexuality, bio-ethics and politics. Plato's words are quoted throughout the text; along with those of other thinkers such as Origen, Aquinas, King Charles I of England, Neitzche, Popper, Benedict XVI, and even Voldemort - the villain of the Harry Potter books.

Ordaining Reality Made Easy

A Guide for Creating the Future

by Joseph E. Donlan

05/31/2009

Many people believe in the Power of Positive Thinking, but no one has succeeded in credibly explaining how mere thoughts can tangibly influence future occurrences. To explain the connection, this book presents a new paradigm of nature and couples it with a convincing explanation of how our right brain hemispheres have a unique ability to tap into the hidden domain of the metaphysical. To support this premise, the reader is lightly exposed to the divergent worlds of physics and metaphysics and is then introduced to a new view of nature that undeniably links mind to matter. Important to its charge, the new perspective makes the case that the future can only be created with thoughts. In the final analysis, the author brings his readers through the necessary steps to put this knowledge to work...

The Hidden Pattern

A Patternist Philosophy of Mind

by Ben Goertzel

05/31/2006

The Hidden Pattern presents a novel philosophy of mind, intended to form a coherent conceptual framework within which it is possible to understand the diverse aspects of mind and intelligence in a unified way. The central concept of the philosophy presented is the concept of “pattern”: minds and the world they live in and co-create are viewed as patterned systems of patterns, evolving over time, and various aspects of subjective experience and individual and social intelligence are analyzed in detail in this light. Many of the ideas presented are motivated by recent research in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, and the author’s own AI research is discussed in moderate detail in one chapter. However, the scope of the book is broader than this, incorporating insight...

How to Prove god Does Not Exist

The Complete Guide to Validating Atheism

by Trevor Treharne

08/09/2012

How to Prove god Does Not Exist is the complete guide to the nonbeliever stance. The most diverse validation of atheism ever written, it deconstructs every major criticism of atheism and defense of religion through logical, philosophical, historical, cultural, moral and scientific means. This builds towards a more strident approach towards asserting atheism, with five key justifications outlined for why god does not exist. This expansive work employs the philosophy of Epicurus, David Hume and Friedrich Nietzsche, the science of Charles Darwin, Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, plus the logic of Bertrand Russell, the psychoanalysis of Sigmund Freud, and the contemporized insights of New Atheism advocates such as Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins. It features original conclud...

by Travis K. Svensson, MD, MPH, PhD

01/15/2003

The efficacy, consequences and ethical principles surrounding sexual reorientation therapies provided by health professionals has been debated in the public, professional and academic arenas since the first interventions were offered. This thesis applies a model for problem solving in bioethics to the issues raised by this debate. This in depth exploration of the facts and fictions surrounding the provision of sexual reorientation interventions through the critical lens of bioethics will be useful to those patients, health professionals, and health policy makers who struggle to make sense of a highly political health care issue. Sexual reorientation is fraught with conflicting moral and ethical implications that impact the patient and the health professional on many levels. Bioethi...

by Gillian Towler Mehta

03/03/2011

The thesis has one main focus, the purity laws of a religious group in Europe, an original piece of research never done before in the UK. The thesis uses diasporic theories of identity; theories of women and the body; theories of women, their bodies and patriarchal religion and theories of women, purity and pollution in religion, to explain why European Zoroastrian women continue to support six of the purity laws of Zoroastrianism in the year 2003. Purity and pollution are at the heart of the Zoroastrian religion and the research demonstrated that Zoroastrians belief in and knowledge of the six purity laws was strong in 2003. Zoroastrians are a diasporic religious group whose modern origins are in Iran and the sub-continent of India. They have been visiting and settling, from the sub-co...

by Martín López Corredoira

05/22/2013

This book gives a challenging point of view about science and its history/philosophy/sociology. Science is in decline. After centuries of great achievements, the exhaustion of new forms and fatigue have reached our culture in all of its manifestations including the pure sciences. Our society is saturated with knowledge which does not offer people any sense in their lives. There is a loss of ideals in the search for great truths and a shift towards an anodyne specialized industry whose main goal is the sustenance and procreation of an endogamic professional caste. A wide audience of educated people interested in these topics will most likely respond to the ideas expressed here as things they have thought about or observed, but have not dared to say out loud. REVIEW "Lopez-Corredoira's a...

Transcendent Apriorism

Pure Reason's Quest for the Noumenal

by Mark Robert Burgess

03/01/2011

The idea that the solitary thinker, using pure reason, can unlock the deepest mysteries of reality is certainly an exciting one. The rationalist dream began with Parmenides of Elea and became the epistemological foundation for the greatest metaphysical systems ever constructed. This thesis traces the complete historical development of this neglected epistemology and inaugurates a radical new appraisal of its method. The new clarity provides fresh insights into traditional puzzles like the Cartesian Circle and whether Plato had a secret esoteric doctrine. A new positive re-evaluation of a doctrine thought to have been refuted by Kant and the positivists will provide interest for students, philosophers and those interested in the history of ideas.

Socrates and Christ

A Study of the Philosophy of Religion

by R. M. Wenley

05/30/2006

"An attempt has been made," writes the author in his preface, "to show that the development of Greek thought and the peculiar character of Judaism necessarily rendered Christ’s work different from that of Socrates. While dogmatic theology undoubtedly contains very many elements derived from Greek philosophy, Christianity at its source is in no wise Greek. Philosophy partly prepared the way for it, and originated not a few doctrines which afterwards became incorporated in Christian dogma. This, however, was only a secondary relationship." In this attempt, the author avoids making any new groundbreaking assertions, and focuses instead on the main currents of scholarship that the two poles have attracted. In Wenley’s own words, "no pretence is made to trench upon disputed points of creed...

Answering the Call

The Story of the U. S. Military Chaplaincy from the Revolution through the Civil War

by William E. Dickens, Jr.

04/16/1999

This book argues that the standardization of the American military chaplaincy occurred during the Civil War. It shows that the chaplains of the North and South provided the model on which the modern chaplaincy is based. This model is seen in both the regulations which were established during this war and the actual ministry of the chaplains with the men of their assigned units. To accomplish this task, the book traces the history of the military chaplaincy from the American Revolution through the American Civil War. This analysis relies heavily on official documents and reports as well as personal accounts, letters, and diaries. It also incorporates appropriate secondary source material.

by Kam-Lun E. Lee

12/10/1997

This thesis will investigate, by means of the historical-critical method, Augustine of Hippo's understanding of the Manichaean idea of the Good, and how this understanding affects his own related notions of summum bonum and personal evil, and, as a corollary, his doctrine of predestination. The question of a possible Manichaean influence is particularly pertinent because Manichaeism is at heart a dualistic solution to the issue of good and evil. The focus is not on Manichaeism per se but on Augustine's perception of it, as more directly affecting his thinking. Augustine's treatise De natura boni (399) in part summarizes his treatment of "the nature of the Good" in earlier polemics. From his first writing, De pulchro et apto (380), to that point, Augustine understands the Manichaean co...

by Charles Tandy

10/31/2002

Robert Ettinger founded the cryonics (cryonic hibernation) movement in the 1960s and authored The Prospect of Immortality and Man into Superman. The ideas presented by Ettinger in these two books are examined in the present volume by living philosophers: • The Prisoner’s Dilemma, Collective Rationality, And The Prospect Of An Indefinite Prolongation Of Life (By John M. Collins) • Desirable And Undesirable Immortality: Ettinger And Arendt On Coping With Human Finitude (By Farhang Erfani) • Immortality, Death, And Our Obligations To Future Generations (By Richard V. Greene) • Time Shock And The Problem Of Anachronistic Being: An Anthropological Approach To Cryonics (By James C. Lindahl) • Caring Cryonics? (By Rita C. Manning) • Ettinger And Immortality (By Scott D. O’Re...

Nichiren's Nationalism

A Buddhist Rhetoric of a Shinto Teaching

by Achilles S C Gacis

08/25/2000

Chapter One, "Religion and Nationalism in Early Kamakura Society" introduces the issues that affected the nation in the early Kamakura period. The first section points out the historical background of the time that was considered to be a spiritually significant age according to Buddhist chronology. The next section on the "Religious Answers to National Problems" provides a prelude to how the indigenous religious tradition of Shinto attempted to define its leaders and their right to rule as well as the divine protection that was to be given them by the native deities. The imported Buddhist teachings provided a new perspective to the national problems through an examination of existing conditions as possibly being consequences of immoral acts. The various characteristics of the teaching...

Margins of Desire

The Foundations of Derrida's Social Ethics

by Niva Arav

09/13/2010

In this research, the author analyzes Derrida's understanding of the way society is created out of a collection of individuals, how the individuals preserve their singularity and freedom within a social system and the meaning of ethics, as it comes out in his early writings. In this work, the researcher used a phenomenological method of research and Cassirer's way of analyzing the symbolic forms as a framework to analyze the early writing of Derrida. Although it is not a common approach to combine Derrida's philosophy with that of Cassirer's, the researcher found that Cassirer's ideas help to show Derrida's unique position.

Raising the Question of Being

A Unification and Critique of the Philosophy of Martin Heidegger

by Rufus A. Duits

11/17/2009

The thesis consists of two main divisions. The first presents an original interpretation of Martin Heidegger's philosophy. The second - premised on the first - presents a fundamental and internal critique of his philosophy. The interpretative division demonstrates the way in which the history of being is structurally grounded in the ontological conformation of Dasein. This amounts to evincing the unity of Heidegger's development of his basic philosophical project: the raising of the question of being, and requires an original account of both the philosophy of the history of being and the existential analysis of Dasein, as well as of the so-called Kehre. The critical division, which is founded upon the conclusions of the interpretative division, focuses on the structural grounding that He...

Overcoming Women's Subordination in the Igbo African Culture and in the Catholic Church

Envisioning an Inclusive Theology with Reference to Women

by Rose N. Uchem

06/09/2001

When African scholars lament over the near destruction of African cultures, they do not reflect the reality of African women's historical traditions of empowerment and inclusion in pre-colonial/pre-Christian African societies, which were also lost in the same process of Western Christian cultural imperialism. Similarly, most male Church theologians writing or speaking about inculturation do not address the deeper cultural issues, which impact heavily on African women. As Nigerian theologian, Rose Mary Edet rightly observed, "policy-related and other research projects concerned with "women in development" often uncover cultural factors without associating them with religious beliefs and myths that rule women's lives" (in Life, women and culture, 1991, Introduction). Yet, these deeper cultur...

The Process of the Cosmos

Philosophical Theology and Cosmology

by Anthony B. Kelly

05/01/1999

This thesis argues that with the advance of scientific knowledge, particularly in cosmology, Natural Theology can now provide an answer to the question as to the reason for the existence of man and the world. Aristotle had reasoned from the contingency of the world to the necessity of a God. He had also concluded that the world was unworthy of God's concern, as God could not be concerned with a world which was significantly different from God himself. Aristotle's reasoning from the world up to God, together with his inability to reason down from God to the world, established an antinomy. The history of subsequent attempts to avoid this antinomy, and to provide an explanation for the existence of the world, is considered. No such attempt is found to be successful. A hidden assumpti...

by Girard M. Sherba

06/01/2001

Before Vatican II, marriage was often considered, or at least popularly expressed, as a union of bodies; that is to say, marriage was an exclusive contract by which a man and a woman mutually handed over their bodies for the purpose of acts which led to the procreation of children. Matrimonial jurisprudence was primarily focused on this marital contract. With the advent of Vatican II and its emphasis on the personalist notion of marriage, a new age dawned whereby canonists, especially auditors of the Roman Rota, were henceforth to view marriage as a union of persons. "Person" is more than a "body"; rather, a person is an individual consisting of wants, needs, desires, impulses, hopes and dreams, whose life experience has been shaped by the milieu "cultural, familial, religious" fro...

Does God Change?

Reconciling the Immutable God with the God of Love

by Jennifer A. Herrick

09/28/2003

THE ISSUE The immutable God and the God of Love? Are they compatible? Does God change? Does it matter? If God is the immutable God, as interpreted from Classical Christian Tradition, a God who remains unalterable, what is the point of prayer? Does prayer, or any of our actions in the world for that matter, have any effect on God? Can we move God? Is God simply a static Being? Is prayer of use if God is absolutely immutable? Does God respond to prayer or to our actions in the world? Classical Tradition has presented us with a picture of an immutable God, a mono-polar God, who remains unalterable, unchanged, transcendent to our history in the world. ...

by Bhaiya Subhash Chandra Prasad

03/15/2000

The influence of Swami Vivekananda on the INDIAN Nationalist Movement is well-known. Swami Vivekananda was not only a visionary, or a monk but a nationalist and a reformer par excellence. Many in our own country think that religion and mysticism and social amelioration and political and economic reconstruction cannot unite and declare that the secular and spiritual ideals are polar opposites. Such a notion has been responsible for the gross misrepresentations of the spirit of Indian philosophy, religion and culture, but the mystics, the saints and the sages of India prove standing refutation of this gross misconception. India's foreign domination is also attributed to her religion which is considered to be dreamy, idealistic, fatalistic, world-denying, pessimistic and unethical and othe...

Comparative Christianity

A Student's Guide to a Religion and its Diverse Traditions

by Thomas A. Russell

07/21/2010

Comparative Christianity: A Student's Guide to a Religion and its Diverse Traditions explores what Christians have in common and then works through the three major subdivisions of the faith: Eastern, Roman, and Protestant. Using categories common to many definitions of religion, each chapter employs the categories of belief, individual and group moral codes, ceremonies, and associations. The book is a good choice for a textbook on Christianity, for the general reader and/or the follower of other religious traditions who want to learn about the Christian faith. By reading this book, readers will have a fuller knowledge of what Christians, whatever tradition, have in common and what distinguishes one Christian group from another. Comparative Christianity is different than other similar bo...

Thomistic Renaissance - The Natural Moral Law

The Reawakening of Scholasticism in Catholic Teaching as Evidenced by Pope John Paul II in Veritatis Splendor

by Rev. John Trigilio

03/08/2004

This dissertation seeks to establish that there is a renaissance of Thomistic Philosophy in the Post-Conciliar Catholic Church, specifically a reawakening of Scholasticism, as evidenced by Pope John Paul II in his encyclical Veritatis Splendor. The Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) ushered in a new era for the Roman Catholic religion prompted by the desire of Pope John XXIII to have the 2,000 year old institution catch up with the modern world and address current problems as well as present the ancient faith in contemporary ways. Prior to Vatican II, there was a monolithic way to explain faith and reason. Theology and Philosophy were rigidly taught via textbook manuals according to a norm established under Pope Pius X who vigorously denounced the errors of Modernism in his encyclical Pas...

by John A. Alifano

03/23/2004

Since its inception in the early nineteenth century, the basic tenet of dispensationalism (a school of Protestant theology which holds that God deals with humankind in different ways in different periods of time called dispensations) has been that the church and Israel are two sharply distinct peoples of God. The distinction is theological in nature; specifically, anthropological (pertaining to humanity), soteriological (pertaining to salvation), and eschatological (pertaining to last things). The tenet of theological distinctiveness has always been the cornerstone for the dispensationalist's belief in the pretribulation rapture of the church: the belief that at the first stage of Christ's two-stage second advent he will endue all who comprise the true church with a resurrected body like h...