Disabled Literature

A Critical Examination of the Portrayal of Individuals with Disabilities in Selected Works of Modern and Contemporary American Literature

by Miles Beauchamp, Wendy Chung, Alijandra Mogilner, & Svetlana Zakinova

06/30/2015

This book examines how authors have used characters with disabilities to elicit emotional reactions in readers; additionally, how writers use disabilities to present individuals as "the other" rather than simply as people. Finally, the book discusses how literature has changed, or is changing, with regards to its presentation of those with a disability.

by William P. DeFeo

10/15/2017

Fundamentals of College Composition (FCC) is a compact, college level writing text that presents the underlying grammatical structures of Standard American English in a format that is understandable without prior formal grammar training. The book’s purpose is to improve the clarity and precision of undergraduate writing. College instructors know that far too many undergraduates write poorly. University English departments teach literature, not fundamental writing; university writing departments teach higher level creative-commercial writing, not fundamental writing. Other disciplines must focus on teaching course content, and have precious little time to devote to improving their undergraduate’s composition skills. A popular reaction to the undergraduate writing dilemma has been to ...

I Came, I Saw, I Translated

An Accelerated Method for Learning Classical Latin in the 21st Century

by Drew A. Mannetter

01/11/2012

I Came, I Saw, I Translated employs a new method to learn Latin. There are numerous distinctive features which set this textbook apart from others on the market. It is aimed at a mature audience of high school or college-aged students. It discusses English grammar concurrently with the Latin grammar. There is no adapted Latin; instead, a primary literature narrative is utilized from the very first word. Book Reviews: Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2013.02.17 by Beert C. Verstraete In nearly all Latin primers for universities and colleges, the student is guided through the grammar in a gradual and incremental manner. Typically, with nouns the first two declensions come first, along with the use of the nominative and the accusative case, and with verbs the first conjugation and perhaps the...

by John P. Anderson

10/12/2017

This non-academic author presents a study of Salinger’s major writings, a study designed to enhance the reader’s enjoyment even in a reread. The study is an analysis of their artistic structure, especially Salinger’s sophisticated use of the narrator’s voice or voices. Catcher comes off as the Hindu Connection, Franny and Zooey as Take Out Zen and Raise High as Kabbalah Reception. The Hindu connection structures what happens to Holden in Catcher, and fast as take out Zen structures what happens to Franny in Franny and Zooey. Principal tenants of Kabbalah influence and structure important aspects of the story Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters, particularly the lack of civil reception of “others” at the wedding reception. These choices were no doubt influenced by Salinger’s ...

Book 1 of Plato's Republic

A Word by Word Guide to Translation (Vol. 2: Chapters 13-24)

by Drew A. Mannetter

06/30/2018

Volume 2 of this new grammatical reader on chapters 13 through 24 of Book 1 of Plato's Republic is the most thorough of available resources, designed for students who have only basic skills as well as those at a more advanced level. The text is complete and not adapted; no difficult passages are excised. The running vocabularies are complete, providing the reader context specific meanings. The text is broken down into sentences, providing a manageable amount of material, and space is provided for translation after each sentence. Every construction and word is discussed in detail and referenced to Smyth's Greek Grammar for further explanation. The details of the text, accents, conjunctions, adverbs, and particles, are not minimized but receive thorough treatment as well. The presentation al...

The Crisis of Negritude

A Study of the Black Movement Against Intellectual Oppression in the Early 20th Century

by Emmanuel E. Egar

01/26/2009

The Negritude movement was initiated in the 1930s by the sisters Jane and Paulette Nardal, who created a journal called The Review of the African World-- a journal that recognized the value of black experiences globally. The name of the movement was grafted from a poem by Aimie Cesaire, "The Return to the Native Land." Negritude flourished between 1930 and 1960, until its eventual collapse due to problems with definitions, ideological floundering, and the burden of foreign language that was inflicted by the writings of Jean Paul Sartre.

Essays in World Languages and Cultures

Stereotypes and the Challenges of Representation

by Yves-Antoine Clemmen, Margit Grieb, and Will Lehman (eds.)

05/01/2018

This volume consists of 16 papers selected from the 22nd Southeast Conference on Foreign Languages, Literatures and Films held on February 25-27, 2016 on the campus of Stetson University in Celebration, Florida. The shared focus of the essays is to examine how writers, filmmakers and language educators address stereotypes in their representations of diverse cultural paradigms by using, deconstructing or displacing these stereotypes. The fourth section of this publication includes 4 experimental poems by the artist Susanne Eules.

Language Across Disciplines

Towards a Critical Reading of Contemporary Academic Discourse

by Marc S. Silver

05/30/2006

Academic discourse is the principle means by which knowledge is constituted in the world today and English is the globalized language in and through which such knowledge most often gets constructed and transmitted. Be it in the form of specialized books, disciplinary journals, international congresses or university lectures, the influence and power of such discourse is enormous. Most students and scholars, however, concern themselves almost exclusively with 'what' is written or said within such discourse, ignoring the often more important question of 'how' what is written or said is expressed or received. This book analyzes and contrasts ways in which writers from the disciplines of History and Economics present themselves and their knowledge claims to their readers, in an attempt to un...

Tourism Writing

A New Literary Genre Unveiling the History, Mystery, and Economy of Places and Events

by Mary S. Palmer

08/20/2018

In this era of advanced technology keeping students' attention often becomes difficult. Teachers need to find new ways to create interest. In writing classes, choosing a topic that involves students is a priority. A new genre, Tourism Writing, is an innovative and effective means of teaching students composition. It can fill this need.Tourism Writing focuses on a particular place or event, provides photos and information on nearby points of interest, and directly invites visitors. This book provides an understanding of how Tourism Writing benefits people in all areas of life. This transfers to classroom assignments when students are asked to write a poem in this genre and they are given lists of possible topics, but they also have the option to choose their own place or event. It becomes a...

The Fall of Literary Theory

A 21st Century Return to Deconstruction and Poststructuralism, with Applications

by Liana Vrajitoru Andreasen

10/16/2017

The book revives literary theory, which was popular at the end of the 20th century, with the purpose of showing how useful it is in the current century in opening the minds of students to the dangers of claiming to have a fixed identity. The book shows that in Western cultures identity is a construct that always sees individuals as lacking something (being fallen) that can be retrieved or gained at the expense of an Other, an adversary seen as standing in the way of identity fulfillment. The book shows the history of "fallenness" through an analysis of Melville's Billy Budd, Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49. It also shows ways to heal identity through an analysis of Toni Morrison's Beloved and Rudolfo Anaya's Tortuga. REVIEWS and WORDS OF PRAISE Author In...

The Fundraising Guide for Chairpersons

Seven Steps to Coordinating Non-Profit and Church Organizations Fund-Raising Events--Including Dinners, Dances, Raffles, Bazaars, Field Days and Lawn Fetes!

by Ron Urbanczyk

07/17/2001

When you run a fund-raising event, there is always a risk that you and your organization could lose rather than make money. In most cases, proper planning and organizing can minimize the risk. In this book, The Chairpersons Guide, Seven Steps to Coordinating Non-Profit and Church Organizations Fund-Raising Events, the author guides the reader through all the critical phases of running a fund-raising event which includes Planning, Organizing, Developing, Marketing, Running, Measuring and Assessing. If you have taken on the challenge and responsibilities of chairing an event, this book is a must read! Developed from over 30 years of personal fund-raising experiences and utilizing common industrial engineering tools used in industry, Ron Urbanczyk guides you through the fundraising pro...

Frontiers of Language and Teaching

Proceedings of the 2010 International Online Language Conference (IOLC 2010)

by Azadeh Shafaei

12/27/2010

This collection is comprised of papers submitted to the 3rd International Online Language Conference (IOLC) held in September 2010. IOLC 2010 was a two-day conference which aimed to provide a forum for academics, practitioners, experts and students to debate current international issues and challenges in the broad area of language learning and teaching. This annual world-renowned conference takes place over the internet, allowing participants to save accommodation and flight expenses and at the same time helping to save our planet by reducing CO2 emissions. All submitted papers went through a double blind review process before a decision was made. This was to ensure the quality level of the conference is kept high.

Thinking Translation: Perspectives from Within and Without

Conference Proceedings Third UEA Postgraduate Translation Symposium

by Rebecca Hyde Parker and Karla Guadarrama Garcia (editors)

08/24/2008

This book is a collection of selected articles based on talks given by established academics and translators, as well as younger researchers, at the third postgraduate symposium organized by the School of Literature and Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, UK. The objective of the third postgraduate translation symposium at the University of East Anglia was to explore the current relevance of theory to the practice of translation. This volume builds on the key ideas and discussion that arose from the symposium, bringing together, amongst others, the current debates concerning the complex relationship between theory and practice in the field of translation studies, taking into consideration a wide range of perspectives, both modern and traditional. A broad cross-section of res...

Genres and Genre Theory in Transition

Specialized Discourses across Media and Modes

by Giuliana Garzone & Cornelia Ilie (eds.)

03/10/2014

This volume collects a series of studies focusing on the evolution of text genres in corporate and professional communication. Genre change is explored in various contexts under the pressure of the increasing importance of new media and the profound social changes that have occurred in the last few decades. Theoretical issues are also raised and discussed, highlighting the need to reconsider the repertoire of conventions traditionally identified in each specific genre, and to reassess and update the analytical tools used to investigate them about three decades after the emergence of genre analysis.

Forbidden Fruit

The Censorship of Literature and Information for Young People

by Sarah McNicol (editor)

11/01/2008

Forbidden Fruit: The Censorship of Literature and Information for Young People was a two day conference held in Southport, UK in June 2008. This collection of papers from the conference will be of interest to teachers, school and public librarians, publishers, and other professionals involved in the provision of literature and information resources for young people, as well as to researchers and students. The proceedings draw together some of the latest research in this area from a number of fields, including librarianship, education, literature, and linguistics. The topics covered include translations and adaptations, pre-censorship by authors, publishers and editors, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and trans) materials, and the views of young people themselves. The papers included in t...

Classifiers in Kam-Tai Languages

A Cognitive and Cultural Perspective

by Tian-Qiao Lu

10/21/2012

This monograph describes and analyzes the syntax of classifiers and cultural taxonomy in more than 20 major languages in southern China and Southeast Asia. It provides comprehensive and in-depth data for professional linguists and rudimental knowledge for postgraduate or undergraduate majors or minors engaged in linguistics. Readers will learn how nouns are categorized in syntax and what cultural factors are involved in such a classification process. This is the first book on Kam-Tai classifiers from both syntactic and sociocultural aspects.

Kafka's Last Pipes

The Burrow and Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk

by John P. Anderson

11/18/2016

Fresh from the twilight zone of Kafka's The Metamorphosis, this non-academic author treats on a line by line basis two of Kafka's last stories, stories written while he was wheezing with tuberculosis. Not surprisingly, these stories features pipes, just what Kafka was thinking about all the time while he was bed ridden, his sore pipes. Kafka experienced the threat of death at the same time as he experienced the love of his life with Dora Diamant. In these two stories Kafka spot-lights fear and love, the most basic human issues and those that had taken possession of Kafka's life. Fear and love in the lives of a mole-like creature alone in a burrow and mice in a crowded colony. In stories with no humans, Kafka teaches us what is most important in being human. The Burrow examines fear-based...

Annals of Language and Learning

Proceedings of the 2009 International Online Language Conference (IOLC 2009)

by Azadeh Shafaei and Mehran Nejati (Eds.)

01/20/2010

Annals of Language and Learning is the conference proceedings of the Second International Online Language Conference which was successfully held in July 2009. This event allowed professors, Master's students, Ph.D. students, and academics from around the world to submit papers pertaining to the areas of the conference theme. The conference was organized by International Online Knowledge Service Provider (IOKSP).

The Semiotics of Beckett's Theatre

A Semiotic Study of the Complete Dramatic Works of Samuel Beckett

by Khaled Besbes

07/30/2007

Semiotics is an interdisciplinary field of research and Beckett’s theatre is one which engages a large spectrum of subjects and concerns that touch upon multiple aspects of human experience. The Beckettian dramatic text, as shall be demonstrated in this book, is a fertile ground for a semiotic investigation that is orchestrated by the profound insights of C. S. Peirce. As it applies semiotics to Beckett’s theatre, this book seeks to preserve, communicate and throw into relief those ‘universal values’ in the playwright’s works which remain unchallenged despite every change and every revolution in human societies. What this book will hopefully contribute to the general canon of theatrical studies is its study of the Beckettian dramatic text not as a model of the ‘absurd’ t...

by Kelechukwu U Ihemere

06/01/2007

This book is intended as a textbook for advanced undergraduate or graduate students in the field of bilingualism and language choice. It reports on a sociolinguistic study of the language choice patterns of the minority Ikwerre ethnic group of Port Harcourt City, Nigeria. Further, it aims primarily to present a systematic and coherent account of the extent and patterning of Ikwerre-NPE bilingualism within the Ikwerre community, focusing on: the means by which people in this community deploy two different codes in their day-to-day communicative interactions and the social and attitudinal motivations for language choice at both the group and individual level. To satisfy these objectives this study has taken into account the pre-existing linguistic, socio-economic and macro-sociological disti...

FACS - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

Remaking Reality - Eroding the Palimpsest - Volume 10, 2007-2008

by Jill Kriegel and Emmanuel Alvarado, et al.

04/08/2009

IN THIS ISSUE: Foreword EMMANUEL ALVARADO Artist’s Commentary CYNTHIA ZAITZ Indelible Ink of the Palimpsest: Language, Myth and Narrative in H.D.’s Trilogy MICHELE BRAUN Mary-ing Isis and Mary Magdalene in “The Flowering of the Rod”: Revisioning and Healing Through Female-Centered Spirituality in H.D.’s Trilogy JULIE GOODSPEED-CHADWICK Rethinking the Maya: Understanding an Ancient Language in Modern Linguistic Terms RHIANNA C. ROGERS Monarch of All I Can Sway: “Crusoeing” Alongside Oscar Wilde’s “The Decay of Lying” VAL CZERNY Mina Loy’s Design Flaws COLBEY EMMERSON REID Form and Function in the Social Perception and Appreciation of Web Sites EMMANUEL ALVARADO In Of Cigarettes, High Heels, and Other Interesting Things: An Introduc...

FACS - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

Catastrophe and Representation - Volume 9, 2006-2007

by Peggy Schaller, et al.

11/15/2007

IN THIS ISSUE: Foreword PEGGY SCHALLER Saisir le désordre: Expressions littéraires de la catastrophe; modalités et enjeux de sa verbalisation AMINA TAHRI The Lesson of the Titanic BREE HOSKIN Places That Disaster Leave Behind BRUCE JANZ Nuclear Families and Nuclear Catastrophe in Alain Resnais’ Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959) PAUL WILLIAMS Personal History, Collective History: Mapping Shock and the Work of Analogy AMANDA IRWIN WILKINS It’s What Isn’t There That Is: Catastrophe, Denial, and Non-Representation in Arshile Gorky’s Art KIM THERIAULT The editors of the Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies literary journal invite submissions on any topic for upcoming issues. FACS is an interdisciplinary journal providing a forum for comparative study in the arts, humani...

Writing Genre Fiction

A Guide to the Craft

by H. Thomas Milhorn, M.D., Ph.D.

04/30/2006

Several years ago, after many years of writing nonfiction, I decided to write a novel -- a medical thriller in the mold of Robin Cook, Michael Crichton, and Michael Palmer. The problem was that, although I knew how to write and had received a number of awards for nonfiction works, I didn't know how to write fiction. So, before putting fingers to keyboard I did a thorough search of the literature, which included reading numerous books and hundreds of website articles. What I discovered was that there simply wasn't one good source from which to learn the craft of writing genre fiction. "Writing Genre Fiction: A Guide to the Craft" is the book I was looking for when I set out on my quest to learn how to write fiction. It is an attempt to share what I learned from my research. It covers the si...

by Vulf Plotkin

05/31/2006

A description of the English language as a dynamic system in the evolutionary process of radical typological restructuring, which has deeply affected its constituent subsystems - grammatical, lexical and phonic.

Frontiers of Language and Teaching, Vol. 2

Proceedings of the 2011 International Online Language Conference (IOLC 2011)

by Azadeh Shafaei (editor)

03/30/2012

This collection covers papers submitted to the 4th International Online Language Conference (IOLC) held in September 2011. IOLC 2011 was a two-day conference which aimed to provide a forum for academics, practitioners, experts and students to debate current international issues and challenges in the broad area of language learning and teaching.

by Peter A. Chew

04/05/2003

This dissertation provides a coherent, synchronic, broad-coverage, generative phonology of Russian. I test the grammar empirically in a number of ways to determine its goodness of fit to Russian. In taking this approach, I aim to avoid making untested (or even incoherent) generalizations based on only a handful of examples. In most cases, the tests show that there are exceptions to the theory, but at least we know what the exceptions are, a baseline is set against which future theories can be measured, and in most cases the percentage of exceptional cases is reduced to below 5%. The principal theoretical outcomes of the work are as follows. First, I show that all of the p...

Working on Texts

Reading Literature Critically

by Enrico Terrinoni

06/29/2012

If reading is inevitably always an experiment, reading literary masterpieces gains one access to a linguistic and semiotic universe that baffles hermeneutic authority, as well as any attempt to propose definitive interpretations. What is good about reading is that it is simultaneously a statement of subjectivity and recognition of the other as a different interpreter of the same signs. Every reading is therefore always provisional. Working on Texts provides some old and new readings of famous literary masterpieces by authors such as John Donne, S.T. Coleridge, Walt Whitman, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Seamus Heaney.

La Novela de las Transnacionales

Hacia Una Nueva Clasificación

by Jessica Ramos-Harthun

09/04/2004

(Complete work in Spanish) This study proposes a new genre: La novela de las transnacionales, which is derived from regrouping several types of novels within the category of the Novela Social of “tendencia antiimperialista”. The key element of this work is to identify the basic characteristics of form and content that allow the definition of this new classification. Acknowledging the fact that there are a great number of novels that address -to varying degrees- the topic of the transnational companies (TNCs), this work is based on three representative novels that comprise the subject as it is developed in an evolutionary manner: El tungsteno (1931) by César Vallejo; Mancha de aceite (1935) by César Uribe Piedrahita; and La trilogía bananera (Viento fuerte 1949...

by Joan Navarre

12/29/1998

This study claims that scholars need to examine all twenty-seven English illustrated editions of Wilde's and Beardsley's Salomë to understand whether Beardsley's compositions do, or do not, illustrate Wilde's words. For the last one hundred years scholars have addressed the aesthetic function of Beardsley's compositions (whether or not Beardsley's compositions illustrate Wilde's words), and each scholar sees something different: Beardsley's compositions are "irrelevant" to Wilde's words; Beardsley's compositions are "relevant" to Wilde's words; Beardsley's compositions are both "irrelevant" and "relevant." What is at issue here is that this traditional dance of signification (scholars' interpretations of the aesthetic function of Beardsley's compositions) relies upon an interpretive str...

by Joshua Safier

06/04/1997

The Yasukuni Shrine -- Japan's national memorial enshrining the spirits of Japanesesoldiers killed in domestic and foreign wars -- occupies a peculiar chapter in Japanese history. Originally designed as a sanctuary to house the spirits of those who died in overthrowing the Tokugawa Regime, Yasukuni was nurtured by the state and then the military into a powerful religious and iconographic center to promote Japanese ultranationalism. Following the close of World War II, the Shrine became the subject of intense politico-religious debates as the Japanese, with the assistance of the international community, consigned themselves to the task of finding a place for Yasukuni as they worked on their postwar project of reinventing nationalism and cultural identity. This thesis provides a n...